World’s Largest Database on Far-Right and Extremist Symbols A Critical Resource for Countering Hate

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Media Contact: Kindred Motes, kindred@globalextremism.org 

The Global Project Against Hate and Extremism (GPAHE) today announced that it has developed and expanded the world’s largest database on global far-right and extremist symbols. This directory, first launched in mid-2023, now includes more than 750 symbols and identifiers which are critical for tech companies, governments, law enforcement agencies, militaries, and civil society organizations worldwide to effectively identify and respond to far-right hate movements. GPAHE’s expansion of the database more than doubles the number of symbols identified, making it an even more extensive and valuable tool for identifying and countering hate and extremism. 

Extremist groups leverage symbols to garner attention, propagate their hateful ideologies, and intimidate targeted communities. Additionally, these symbols serve as a means of conveying membership and solidarity, akin to gang symbols, thereby acting as powerful recruitment and intimidation tools. Since the database was launched, it has been used by social media companies to assist in screening content shared on their platforms. The database is also available in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s digital resource library, where it can be widely shared and utilized by authorities to combat hate crimes and extremist activity.  GPAHE has made this tool available to law enforcement agencies, Veterans Affairs, UN officials, and others in the US and across the world. 

Far-right extremism is a transnational movement with groups learning from and sharing with similar groups in other countries, co-opting hateful narratives, tactical playbooks, logos, and symbols. Since these movements operate on a global scale, it calls for a proactive and coordinated response. This directory is designed to aid a diverse range of stakeholders including law enforcement, tech companies, policymakers, military branches, researchers, media, and advocates to identify and understand extremist networks and ultimately combat the narratives and violence coming from far-right hate and extremist groups. 

Entries include not only a description of symbols related to hate or extremist groups but also those included or featured in clothing, literature, media, common phrases, or memes.

Recent additions include: 

  • Logos for more than 100 neo-Nazi Active Clubs worldwide
  • A significant number of new entries from Germany, Brazil, and Ukraine. 
  • Entries for the violent neo-Nazi group the Order of Nine Angles and its various splinter groups (Group 764, Rapewaffen). 
  • Several entries detailing the logos of hate music bands in multiple countries.
  • New additions of hateful text include the phrases “6 Million Wasn’t Enough” (6MWE), “Bevara Sverige Svenskt” (Keep Sweden Swedish), “Conquered, Not Stolen,” “By God We’ll Have Our Home Again,” and “Supreme Gentleman.” 
  • Additionally, there are new entries for symbols that have been co-opted and frequently used by extremists, but which are not inherently extremist, such as the Vasakärve, the Chrism, and the Mjölnir. As GPAHE emphasizes, in these cases, context is critical to deciding whether the symbol’s use is extremist. 

GPAHE also added entries of symbols and logos for additional European far-right political parties and organizations, many of which have seen their vote shares rise of late. Among others, these symbols include the logos for:

  • The National Party – Greeks (Εθνικό Κόμμα – Έλληνες)
  • Democracia Nacional (National Democracy)
  • Alternative für Deutschland (Alternative for Germany)
  • Junge Alternative für Deutschland (Young Alternative for Germany)
  • Junge Nationalisten (Young Nationalists)
  • Die Heimat (Homeland), and Die Rechte (the Right). 

For more information on far-right political parties and organizations, see GPAHE’s country reports, which share deep research on far-right extremist groups and movements in multiple countries, and explain in depth why these political parties are included in our listings of far-right hate and extremist groups. ###

About GPAHE: Launched in 2020, the Global Project Against Hate and Extremism (GPAHE) was founded to address the gap in efforts to stop transnational hate and far-right extremism movements, particularly U.S.-based activity that is exported to other countries and across borders. GPAHE tackles the issue of hate and extremism by working to reduce the associated violence that terrorizes communities and our society and tackling systemic problems rooted in hate in our governments and societies.

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