Project Advocating the Ethnic Cleansing of Europe Launched in Switzerland

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Vision Remigration, led by neo-Nazis, is growing rapidly online and off since its April launch 

In April, a new Telegram account opened with a post featuring a large banner drop in Switzerland with one word: “remigration.” That was the launch of Vision Remigration, a new project inspired by the racist “Great Replacement” conspiracy theory, which alleges that white people are being intentionally displaced in their homelands by people of color, mainly immigrants and refugees. Vision Remigration, led by individuals with neo-Nazi and other extremist links, calls for state policies to deport en masse people of non-European descent “back” to their “home countries.” In its own words, Vision Remigration attempts to “[formulate] solutions for current migration policy and population exchange, which are grouped together under the term remigration.” The word remigration is nothing more than a more “acceptable” term for what amounts to ethnic cleansing, removing people of non-European descent from the continent. 

The concept of remigration garnered international attention in early 2024, when Austrian Martin Sellner, de-facto leader of the white nationalist Identitarian movement in Europe, delivered a lecture on remigration to members of the far-right German party Alternative Für Deutschland (AfD) in Potsdam, Germany. His calls for ethnic cleansing of immigrants created a firestorm in Germany and mass rallies against the AfD. This meeting followed AfD member’s Matthias Helferich launching his own campaign called “Vision Remigration” in December 2023. But now, the Swiss’ Vision Remigration movement is attempting to export this idea, in its more innocuous sounding form, and instill it in far-right party platforms across Europe, starting with Switzerland. They’ve been organizing rapidly, hosting three events since mid-April, including a series of lectures advocating for remigration, and another “information session” planned for June

Vision Remigration shares a picture of a banner drop in Winterthur, Switzerland (Source: Telegram)

Vision Remigration Leadership

Vision Remigration is led by members of the neo-Nazi group “Junge Tat” (“Youth Action”), a small outfit led by former “Eisenjugend” (“Iron Youth”) leader Manuel Corchia, and based in the German-speaking areas of Switzerland, primarily near Zurich. They identify as an “Identitarian Movement 2.0.” Their leadership maintains links with fascist and neo-Nazi groups across Europe, like Kampf der Nibelungen, Blood and Honour, and Combat 18. Junge Tat has openly endorsed violence, including sharing the manifesto of the Christchurch shooter, titled “The Great Replacement,” which served as the impetus for the murders of 51 at two mosques in New Zealand. The security forces have, on several occasions, seized weapons from members, and the Swiss intelligence service has stated that they “have the group on their radar.” At least one member is allegedly employed with the Swiss military police as of 2023.

Corchia, in addition to helping lead Junge Tat, is also providing leadership to Vision Remigration and has an extensive history of far-right extremism and the promotion of neo-Nazism. In 2020, while leading Iron Youth, Corchia, under the username “Alles Gute A.H 88,” (A.H standing for Adolf Hitler and 88 being numerical code for “HH,” or “Heil Hitler”) and five others disrupted an online lecture at the Zurich University of the Arts, yelling “Heil Hitler” and “Seig Heil” on April 20, Hitler’s birthday. At the University, he also distributed a series of hateful stickers, including those saying that “mixed children are more susceptible to health problems,” “mixed babies are born unhealthier than unmixed babies,” “mixed-race couples are more violent than white couples,” and some featuring the Black Sun, Swastika and pictures of Adolf Hitler. Corchia also posted a series of racist symbols on the fringe platforms Minds and Gab, the latter of which was used by the perpetrator of the Pittsburgh Synagogue mass shooting in 2018 to spread “Great Replacement” rhetoric, including a post signaling his intentions to target Jews. Corchia was later sentenced to fines and expelled from the university. That same year, Corchia’s home was raided on the suspicion of illegal possession of weapons, where police found several firearms. Corchia was convicted of owning an AK-47 without a permit.

During his time as a leader in Junge Tat, Corchia acted as the group’s cameraman to document “aesthetic interventions” and post them online. Junge Tat members, including Corchia, took part in an AfD demonstration on October 8, 2022. Members were caught on video chanting “Junge Alternative” (Young Alternative), which is the youth faction of the AfD and designated as far-right extremist by the German Office for the Protection of the Constitution. In February 2023, Corchia, along with the white nationalist Identitäre Bewegung (Identitarian Movement, IB), detonated smoke bombs in front of a refugee shelter in Gladenbach, Upper Bavaria. Corchia and fellow Junge Tat and Vision Remigration member Tobias Lingg were named as suspects and subsequently lauded as heroes by several Identitarian groups and individuals, including “wackre_schwaben,” “lederhosenrevolte,” Gernot Schmidt (“Philip Thaler”), and even former AfD deputy state spokesperson for North Rhine-Wesphalia Matthias Helferich. In October 2023, Corchia spoke at a far-right gathering in Brussels devoted to remigration, which featured other Identitarian figures like Belgian group Schild & Vrienden’s (Shield and Friends) leader Dries van Langenhove, who was recently sentenced to a year in prison for Holocaust denial, incitement of hatred and racism, and breaching local gun laws, and Martin Sellner, who before becoming the leading Identitarian once belonged to a neo-Nazi group called “Stolz und Frei” (“Proud and Free”).

Tobias Lingg, another member of Junge Tat, shares a similar history with Corchia, also being convicted of racial discrimination for disrupting an online lecture in Zurich alongside Iron Youth members. Lingg used the username “Birthday Guest A.H.” to perform his hateful harassment. Lingg was also present at the AfD rally in October 2022, chanting “if you don’t love Germany, you should leave Germany.” Also in 2022, Lingg led Junge Tat in its largest public appearance at a demonstration against COVID-19 measures in Bern, Switzerland. Lingg was reportedly caught on video beating a counter-demonstrator while they were already on the ground. He frequently collaborates with fellow Junge Tat member Moritz Frey, meeting with members of Schild & Vrienden and attending a “Summer Academy” organized by the German Institute for State Policy (IfS), an Identitarian think tank led by Götz Kubitschek. The IfS was officially labeled as right-wing extremist by the Saxony-Anhalt State Office for the Protection of the Constitution.

Tobias Lingg (left) and Manuel Corchia (right) from Junge Tat with Martin Sellner (center). (Source: watson.ch)

The third leader of Vision Remigration is Selina Dienemann, who goes by the name Selina Sunnetanz on social media. Dienemann has been part of Junge Tat since 2022, and has taken part in multiple demonstrations. Disguised as a guest, she protested a Drag Queen Story Time in Zurich, trying to hold up a banner protesting “gender ideology,” a euphemism used by the far right to frame the effort to protect LGBTQ+ rights as a harmful conspiracy. In December 2022, she and others “dressed up” as Muslims and pretended to “execute” Swiss people in Schaffhausen. She has also interviewed both Corchia and Lingg for Junge Tat propaganda.

Vision Remigration Gains Traction on Social Media

Vision Remigration is growing quickly across mainstream and fringe platforms, posting content about the “Great Replacement” conspiracy theory, remigration, as well as other hateful anti-LGBTQ+, anti-Muslim, and anti-Arab content. Unsurprisingly, Vision Remigration has been steadily growing on Telegram, a platform notorious for allowing illegal and extremist content, starting with 93 subscribers in April before more than doubling to 278 in May. Information on upcoming events along with propaganda advertising their previous outings can be found here. Telegram also serves as a base for their propaganda to be shared by other far-right groups, individuals, and aggregator accounts, like Junge Tat, Martin Sellner, Reconquista 21, and Heimatkurier (Homeland Courier). Heimatkurier, run by former Identitäre Bewegung Vienna leader Philipp Huemer, also hosted Tobias Lingg, who is advertised to be part of Junge Tat, on their podcast. On other platforms flooded with far-right extremists, like Twitter and Rumble, Vision Remigration has 346 followers and 10 subscribers as of May, respectively.

But the bigger problem lies with mainstream social media, where Vision Remigration material is surging. The effort has a social media presence on both of Meta’s major social media platforms. They have a Facebook page and on Instagram, Vision Remigration made its first post on April 14, and now as of May, has 872 followers, a 25 percent increase.

Their viewership on YouTube, meanwhile, has skyrocketed from 13 to 273 subscribers, a staggering 2,000 percent increase, from April to May. YouTube is supposed to have a label warning users about content discussing the “Great Replacement” conspiracy theory, but as we’ve seen before, they are incredibly poor at flagging non-English content. No videos hosted on Vision Remigration’s channel have these labels. 

There are videos posted of both Corchia and Lingg speaking on remigration at a lecture series hosted by Vision Remigration. In Corchia’s lecture, he celebrates remigration being “popularized by various political movements in the last few decades as a solution for population exchange.” The term population exchange is synonymous with the “Great Replacement.” He also blames crime on an ongoing “cultural change in subcultures that glorify violence” which is “largely due to the increasing foreign population.” As a result, borrowing from Sellner’s proposal to AfD, Corchia proposes to outsource Switzerland’s asylum procedure “to anchor centers outside Europe, for example in North Africa.” Lingg’s lecture focused more specifically on crime, blaming “parallel societ[ies]” created by migrants as a reason for lack of assimilation, and subsequently, more crime, focusing on violent crimes and sexual assault. Unfortunately, allowing this content to flourish is not new for YouTube, considering its history as a superspreader of the “Great Replacement” conspiracy theory.

Individually, each of the three founders have platforms on TikTok. Manuel Corchia has just over 1,500 followers on TikTok under the name “WinterthurerAktivist.” Winterthur is a city in northern Switzerland. Martin Sellner is banned on Tiktok, and any searches with his name lead to a page saying “this phrase may be associated with hateful behavior.” Regardless, content featuring Sellner appears on Corchia’s channel. Corchia successfully evades auto-moderation by replacing Martin with “M@rtin” and covering his face with the Swiss flag.

Martin Sellner appears on a TikTok video posted by Corchia with his face covered by the Swiss flag in order to avoid content moderation (Source: TikTok)

Lingg currently sits at 264 followers with an account called tobi_jtat, presumably short for Tobias_JungeTat, and has one post blaming migrants for sexual assault and violent crime, accompanied by shockingly racist imagery of a black hand holding the face of a young white girl.

Racist imagery on TikTok posted by Tobias Lingg (Source: TikTok)

Selina Dienemann has the highest follower count of the three, with 8,295, under her pseudonym Selina Sunnetanz. While she doesn’t have many videos, they target the LGBTQ+ community and promote remigration to her audience.

Dienemann’s TikTok account features content like “Remigration explained for dummies,” meant to make the racist concept more accessible to the site’s young user base (Source: TikTok).

Vision Remigration’s call for ethnic cleansing, its neo-Nazi ties and spreading of the terrorist-inspiring “Great Replacement” conspiracy theory, should have no place on mainstream social media sites. The rapid growth of these accounts, and their role in spreading hateful messaging, especially in the lead up to the June European Union elections, is incredibly concerning. As online social media platforms play an increasingly important role in the radicalization processes of extremists and the transnational sharing of violent ideas, including in the United States, tech companies must create and enforce sound policy meant to protect their own users. Vision Remigration is only one of many groups calling for remigration, so it remains imperative that these companies continue to adapt alongside the creation of these groups and their hateful ideas.

1911 930 Global Project Against Hate and Extremism
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